Technology

Electronics is the science of controlling electrical energy electrically, in which the electrons have a fundamental role. Electronics deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components (such as vacuum tubestransistorsdiodesintegrated circuitsoptoelectronics, and sensors), associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies. Commonly, electronic devices contain circuitry consisting primarily or exclusively of active semiconductorssupplemented with passive elements; such a circuit is described as an electronic circuit.

The science of electronics is considered to be a branch of physics and electrical engineering.[1][2]

The nonlinear behaviour of active components and their ability to control electron flows makes amplification of weak signals possible. Electronics is widely used in information processingtelecommunication, and signal processing. The ability of electronic devices to act as switches makes digital information processing possible. Interconnection technologies such as circuit boards, electronics packaging technology, and other varied forms of communication infrastructure complete circuit functionality and transform the mixed components into a regular working system.

Electronics is distinct from electrical and electro-mechanical science and technology, which deal with the generation, distribution, switching, storage, and conversion of electrical energy to and from other energy forms using wiresmotorsgeneratorsbatteriesswitchesrelaystransformersresistors, and other passive components. This distinction started around 1906 with the invention by Lee De Forest of the triode, which made electrical amplification of weak radio signals and audio signals possible with a non-mechanical device. Until 1950 this field was called “radio technology” because its principal application was the design and theory of radio transmittersreceivers, and vacuum tubes.

Today, most electronic devices use semiconductor components to perform electron control. The study of semiconductor devices and related technology is considered a branch of solid-state physics, whereas the design and construction of electronic circuits to solve practical problems come under electronics engineering. This article focuses on engineering aspects of electronics.

Transport or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another. Modes of transportinclude airland (rail and road), watercablepipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructurevehicles and operations. Transport is important because it enables trade between people, which is essential for the development of civilizations.

Transport infrastructure consists of the fixed installations including roadsrailwaysairwayswaterwayscanals and pipelinesand terminals such as airportsrailway stationsbus stationswarehouses, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.

Vehicles traveling on these networks may include automobilesbicyclesbusestrainstruckspeoplehelicopterswatercraftspacecraft and aircraft.

Operations deal with the way the vehicles are operated, and the procedures set for this purpose including financing, legalities, and policies. In the transport industry, operations and ownership of infrastructure can be either public or private, depending on the country and mode.

Passenger transport may be public, where operators provide scheduled services, or private. Freight transport has become focused on containerization, although bulk transport is used for large volumes of durable items. Transport plays an important part in economic growth and globalization, but most types cause air pollution and use large amounts of land. While it is heavily subsidized by governments, good planning of transport is essential to make traffic flow and restrain urban sprawl.

Transport or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another. Modes of transportinclude airland (rail and road), watercablepipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructurevehicles and operations. Transport is important because it enables trade between people, which is essential for the development of civilizations.

Transport infrastructure consists of the fixed installations including roadsrailwaysairwayswaterwayscanals and pipelinesand terminals such as airportsrailway stationsbus stationswarehouses, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.

Vehicles traveling on these networks may include automobilesbicyclesbusestrainstruckspeoplehelicopterswatercraftspacecraft and aircraft.

Operations deal with the way the vehicles are operated, and the procedures set for this purpose including financing, legalities, and policies. In the transport industry, operations and ownership of infrastructure can be either public or private, depending on the country and mode.

Passenger transport may be public, where operators provide scheduled services, or private. Freight transport has become focused on containerization, although bulk transport is used for large volumes of durable items. Transport plays an important part in economic growth and globalization, but most types cause air pollution and use large amounts of land. While it is heavily subsidized by governments, good planning of transport is essential to make traffic flow and restrain urban sprawl.

High technology, often abbreviated to high tech (adjective forms high-technologyhigh-tech or hi-tech) is technology that is at the cutting edge: the most advanced technology available.

As of the onset of the 21st century, products considered high tech are often those that incorporate advanced computerelectronics. However, there is no specific class of technology that is high tech—the definition shifts and evolves over time—so products hyped as high-tech in the past may now be considered to be everyday or even outdated technology.

The opposite of high tech is low technology, referring to simple, often traditional or mechanical technology; for example, a calculator is a low-tech calculating device.

Nanotechnology (“nanotech“) is manipulation of matter on an atomicmolecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter which occur below the given size threshold. It is therefore common to see the plural form “nanotechnologies” as well as “nanoscale technologies” to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Because of the variety of potential applications (including industrial and military), governments have invested billions of dollars in nanotechnology research. Until 2012, through its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the USA has invested $3.7 billion, the European Union has invested $1.2 billion and Japan has $750 million.[3]

Nanotechnology as defined by size is naturally very broad, including fields of science as diverse as surface scienceorganic chemistrymolecular biologysemiconductor physicsenergy storage,[4][5]microfabrication,[6]molecular engineering, etc.[7]The associated research and applications are equally diverse, ranging from extensions of conventional device physics to completely new approaches based upon molecular self-assembly,[8] from developing new materials with dimensions on the nanoscale to direct control of matter on the atomic scale.

Scientists currently debate the future implications of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology may be able to create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications, such as in nanomedicinenanoelectronicsbiomaterials energy production, and consumer products. On the other hand, nanotechnology raises many of the same issues as any new technology, including concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials,[9] and their potential effects on global economics, as well as speculation about various doomsday scenarios. These concerns have led to a debate among advocacy groups and governments on whether special regulation of nanotechnology is warranted.

technology

 

 

 

Biotechnology is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or “any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use” (UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Art. 2).[1] Depending on the tools and applications, it often overlaps with the (related) fields of bioengineeringbiomedical engineeringbiomanufacturingmolecular engineering, etc.

For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculturefood production, and medicine.[2] The term is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarian engineer Károly Ereky. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, biotechnology has expanded to include new and diverse sciences such as genomicsrecombinant genetechniques, applied immunology, and development of pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic test

Image result for Biotechnology images

The wide concept of “biotech” or “biotechnology” encompasses a wide range of procedures for modifying living organisms according to human purposes, going back to domestication of animals, cultivation of the plants, and “improvements” to these through breeding programs that employ artificial selection and hybridization. Modern usage also includes genetic engineering as well as cell and tissue culture technologies. The American Chemical Society defines biotechnology as the application of biological organisms, systems, or processes by various industries to learning about the science of life and the improvement of the value of materials and organisms such as pharmaceuticals, crops, and livestock.[3] As per European Federation of Biotechnology, biotechnology is the integration of natural science and organisms, cells, parts thereof, and molecular analogues for products and services.[4] Biotechnology also writes on[clarification needed] the pure biological sciences (animal cell culturebiochemistrycell biologyembryologygeneticsmicrobiology, and molecular biology). In many instances, it is also dependent on knowledge and methods from outside the sphere of biology including:

Image result for biotechnology images

 

 

Biotechnology

Biotechnology is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or “any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use” (UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Art. 2).Depending on the tools and applications, it often overlaps with the (related) fields of bioengineeringbiomedical engineeringbiomanufacturingmolecular engineering, etc.

For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculturefood production, and medicine. The term is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarian engineer Károly Ereky. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, biotechnology has expanded to include new and diverse sciences such as genomicsrecombinant gene techniques, applied immunology, and development of pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic tests.

Medicine

In medicine, modern biotechnology finds applications in areas such as pharmaceutical drug discovery and production, pharmacogenomics, and genetic testing (or genetic screening). DNA microarray chip – some can do as many as a million blood tests at once Pharmacogenomics (a combination of pharmacology and genomics) is the technology that analyses how genetic makeup affects an individual’s response to drugs.It deals with the influence of genetic variation on drug response in patients by correlating gene expression or single-nucleotide polymorphisms with a drug’s efficacy or toxicity.By doing so, pharmacogenomics aims to develop rational means to optimize drug therapy, with respect to the patients’ genotype, to ensure maximum efficacy with minimal adverse effects. Such approaches promise the advent of “personalized medicine“; in which drugs and drug combinations are optimized for each individual’s unique genetic makeup.

technology of fighter planes

HAL initiated the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) programme in 1983 to develop a replacement aircraft for IAF’s ageing MiG-21. The remaining MiG-21 Bisons of IAF are scheduled to be phased out by 2019.[16] After development during the 80s and 90s the first flight occurred in 2001. The aircraft has since been named HAL Tejas. Finally after Initial Operation Clearance status (IOC) Tejas is officially inducted in IAF for Final Operational Clearance (FOC) on 10 January 2014. The IAF plans to order 10 squadrons of the aircraft.[17] The IAF is reported to have a requirement for 200 single-seat and 20 two-seat conversion trainers. It has ordered 40 Tejas.[18] In October 2015 IAF announced that it will induct 100-120 Tejas Mk-IA instead of Mk-I standard. The Mk-IA variant will feature an AESA Radar and improved specifications which will improve its performance.In 2017, it was reported that HAL will deliver 123 Tejas by 2024-25[19]

On 10 April 2015, during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Paris, it was announced that India would buy 36 Dassault Rafales in fly-away condition.[20] The deal was finalised in November 2015. However, it got stalled for a considerable amount of time in terms of price negotiation. Finally, the deadlock has been resolved

TECHNOLOGY

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF TECHNOLOGY

ADVANTAGES

First, the evolution of technology is beneficial to humans for several reasons. At the medical level, technology can help treat more sick people and consequently save many lives and combat very harmful viruses and bacteria.

 

>See also: Technology is revolutionising the property industry

The invention of the computer was a very important point. Communication is thus enhanced, and companies can communicate more easily with foreign countries. Research is also simplified.

For companies, progress is saving in time and therefore in money. Exchanges are faster especially with the internet. Sales and purchases are now facilitated and possible worldwide. This allows businesses to buy raw materials with discounts or at reduced prices. Similarly, global tourism has grown.

Technology has also increased the productivity of almost every industry in the world.

When observed more closely, new things are discovered every day. Let’s take for instance when radio waves were discovered, radio broadcasts followed suit almost immediately. The same applies to the television and electricity. If no one had discovered that electricity could be generated, then the entertainment industry wouldn’t be at it’s current stage of development.

Technology improves daily lives; allowing to move physical storage units to virtual storage banks and more. Scientists of the time are also able to send astronauts to the moon thanks to technology.

In the modern industrial world, machines carry out most of the agricultural and industrial work and as a result, workers produce much more goods than a century ago and work less. They have more time to exercise and work in safer environments.

DISADVANTAGES

On the other hand, the evolution of modern technology has disadvantages, for example, dependence on new technology. Man no longer needs to think. Even if the calculator is a good invention, man no longer makes mental calculation and no longer works his memory. The decline of human capital implies an increase in unemployment. In some areas, devices can replace the human mind.

The use of technology certainly needs rule and new laws. For example internet use is an individual freedom. However, the invention of the atomic bomb cannot be an individual freedom. In fact, regulations are difficult to implement when these technologies are introduced – such as regulation surrounding the impending arrival of autonomous vehicles.

Finally, as most technological discoveries aim to reduce human effort, it would imply that more work is done by machines. This equates to less work for people: the human is becoming ever so obsolete by the day, as processes become automated and jobs are made redundant.

The negative impact of the influence of technology on children should not be underestimated as well.

TECHNOLOGY

ELECTRONICS

Electronics is the science of controlling electrical energy electrically, in which the electrons have a fundamental role. Electronics deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components (such as vacuum tubes, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, optoelectronics, and sensors), associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies. Commonly, electronic devices contain circuitry consisting primarily or exclusively of active semiconductors supplemented with passive elements; such a circuit is described as an electronic circuit.

The science of electronics is considered to be a branch of physics and electrical engineering.[1][2]

The nonlinear behaviour of active components and their ability to control electron flows makes amplification of weak signals possible. Electronics is widely used in information processing, telecommunication, and signal processing. The ability of electronic devices to act as switches makes digital information processing possible. Interconnection technologies such as circuit boards, electronics packaging technology, and other varied forms of communication infrastructure complete circuit functionality and transform the mixed components into a regular working system.

Electronics is distinct from electrical and electro-mechanical science and technology, which deal with the generation, distribution, switching, storage, and conversion of electrical energy to and from other energy forms using wires, motors, generators, batteries, switches, relays, transformers, resistors, and other passive components. This distinction started around 1906 with the invention by Lee De Forest of the triode, which made electrical amplification of weak radio signals and audio signals possible with a non-mechanical device. Until 1950 this field was called “radio technology” because its principal application was the design and theory of radio transmitters, receivers, and vacuum tubes.

Today, most electronic devices use semiconductor components to perform electron control. The study of semiconductor devices and related technology is considered a branch of solid-state physics, whereas the design and construction of electronic circuits to solve practical problems come under electronics engineering. This article focuses on engineering aspects of electronics

Technology

Most people agree that our technology is getting smarter, but most don’t realize just how smart. Sure, they know their smart phones have GPS capability and their smart appliances are capable of improving efficiency, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. In reality, smart technology is around us every day. From surveillance cameras to clothing, today’s smart technology is watching us, helping us, and getting smarter because of us.   

Smart Video

As an example, let’s look at in-store surveillance cameras. In the past, the video quality of those cameras was poor. Most of us can remember watching the nightly news and seeing blurry footage of a robbery and not being able to make anything out.

Today we have two things taking place that alleviate that scenario. 1) We have software that can clean up the video footage so we can see the detail. 2) We have inexpensive cameras that can replace those old, bigger cameras, and that can give us full 1080P HD video resolution at a low cost.

Now you might be thinking, “So, what? That just means the police will be able to better identify who was robbing a store.” 

Actually, it’s a much bigger deal than that. With today’s smart technology, companies are tapping into these video streams and, using high-speed computer analytics, are doing shopping analyses within the store, based on the security camera footage. In other words, security cameras are able to expose a wealth of sales and marketing data.

We can see customer movements, what products they stop in front of, and how often they stop in front of them. We can see if that display at the end of the counter is working or not. At the end of each evening, we can get a report on all the traffic patterns in the store without having to watch all the video because it’s all automated. The report can show where delays are taking place in the store, where the lines are building up, where people are spending most of the time in the store, where people are not going in the store, what products are the hottest, and which aisles are being browsed and for how long.  In addition, as the price of real-time analytics drops, all of the sales and marketing intelligence can be accessed as it happens and adjustments made on the spot.

And that’s just information from inside the store! When you take the camera outside the store, its uses are even more amazing.  

Smart Technology You Can Wear

Realize that smart technology isn’t always about something you hold in your hand or a device you intentionally manipulate. Now, even the clothes you wear can have a technological component.

For example, there already is a product called “The Helmet Hero.” With it, you can take a helmet, such as a bicycle, ski, or motorcycle helmet, and mount a small high-definition camera on it that can record as HD video or capture still photography. Thanks to an SD card, you can record up to 2½ hours on a single charge.

Additionally, since one of the hard trends of technology is the ability to make things smaller and smaller, you can create high-quality video or still camera pictures from a very small lens that’s clipped to or embedded in your sunglasses, and then upload it directly to Facebook or other social media platforms. So, for example, if you’re walking on the beach or hiking a mountain, you can have that feed go directly to your video Facebook page.

While this might sound great, the newest wearable technology goes even beyond all this. For example, Adidas has created an “intelligent football boot” that can upload performance data, including your maximum speed, minimum speed, the number of sprints you took, the distance you took for each sprint, the distance you went at a high-intensity level, etc. In other words, they’ve created a true training device that keeps track of your entire training regimen. They started with football, but it will surely spread to other sports.

Going a little further, the US military has developed smart underwear. It looks just like normal underwear, but it has micro sensors that can monitor respiration, heart rate, body posture, and skin temperature. Now we can really see what’s happening with troops in the field. And since all the data can be transmitted wirelessly, we can monitor the well-being of all of the people in real time. If someone has a problem or has been wounded, we already have body monitors on them in their underwear.

Now let’s take that to the next level. If this technology works for the military, couldn’t intelligent underwear work for professional sports too? Of course. It can track hydration levels, heart rate, and other things to help coaches determine when to pull someone from the field.

Going even further, smart underwear has a medical application too. People who are having a medical problem and who need to be monitored over time can wear the smart underwear and the data can be instantly streamed to the doctor’s office for analysis. Currently you have to wear expensive monitors and report to the doctor’s office to get the information from the monitor read. It’s both costly and time consuming. But with the smart underwear, it’s quick and much less expensive.

Today’s technology, tomorrow’s trash?

As a UN report warns of the hazards of electronic waste, we ask if the world is ready to tackle technology trash.

The number of electronic and electrical gadgets being dumped around the world is set to soar, raising concerns about the impact on the environment and human health.

Rapid advances in technology are giving rise to what is being described as a buy-it-and-bin-it generation. People are throwing away everything from TVs to toys, computers to cameras, and mobile phones to motorised toothbrushes.

The fact is some of the [e-waste] supply chains are very long. In the UK there are many sub-contractors who get involved in the supply chain and divert the e-waste on to the black market rather than go into the proper recycling facility.

Julian Newman, Campaigns Director for the Environmental Investigation Agency, UK

Now, a new UN study is forecasting that the amount of global e-waste, as it is called, will rise by one-third by 2017.

The report says 48.9 million metric tons of e-waste was produced last year. That is expected to rise by 33 percent by 2017 bringing total global e-waste to 65.4 million tons.

That is enough to fill a line of 40-ton trucks that, end-to-end, would stretch three-quarters of the way around the world.

The largest producers are the US and China. They generated 10 million tons and 11.1 million tons respectively last year.

Each American is said to be responsible for an average 29.8kg of hi-tech trash a year that is almost six times higher than China’s per capita figure of 5.4kg.

There are laws in Europe, quite strong laws, about the rules what we can export or what we cannot export yet we see these laws are disregarded often and we see the evidence in places like Ghana, Nigeria, India and China where we can go to the dump sites and see computers from Europe openly being broken down illegally,” explains Julian Newman, the campaigns director for the Environmental Investigation Agency in the UK.

The UN study has been carried out by StEP (Solving the E-waste Problem), a coalition of UN organisations, industry, governments, NGOs and science bodies.

“Some countries are moving towards safe recycling and reuse of e-waste. But it’s feared the increasing demand for electronics, will overwhelm existing facilities. This could see millions of tonnes of waste dumped into landfills,” Ruediger Kuehr, the executive secretary of StEP told Al Jazeera.

The report warns that e-waste is being dumped illegally in developing countries. It says the garbage contains toxic substances such as mercury, cadmium and arsenic, which can seep into landfills, contaminating the ground, water and air.

The study adds that devices are often dismantled in dangerous conditions, harming the health of those involved.

StEP is calling for better monitoring of e-waste exports, and more effective rules for the treatment of electrical junk.

So why is today’s technology destined to become tomorrow’s trash? And what is being done to tackle the growing global crisis of e-waste?

Inside Story presenter Sohail Rahman discusses with guests: Sami Uz Zaman, a consultant for Global Environmental Management Services, an environmental court judge, and an industrial research scientist in Pakistan; Julian Newman, the campaigns director for the Environmental Investigation Agency in the UK; and Akshat Ghiya, the co-founder and director of Karma Recycling, specialising in electronic waste in India.

Science

Science (from Latin scientia, meaning “knowledge”)[2][3]:58 is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[a]

Contemporary science is typically subdivided into the natural sciences which study the material world, the social sciences which study people and societies, and the formal sciences like mathematics. The formal sciences are often distinguished from the empirical sciences as the former does not depend on empirical observations.[4][5] Disciplines which use science like engineering and medicine may also be considered to be applied sciences.[6] Science is related to research, and is normally organized by a university, a college, or a research institute.

From classical antiquity through the 19th century, science as a type of knowledge was more closely linked to philosophy than it is now and, in fact, in the West the term “natural philosophy” encompassed fields of study that are today associated with science such as physics, astronomy, medicine, among many others.[7]:3[b] In the 17th and 18th centuries scientists increasingly sought to formulate knowledge in terms of laws of nature. As a slow process over centuries, the word “science” became increasingly associated with what is today known as the scientific method, a structured way to study the natural world.[8][9]

6 Indian Military Technology That Will Make Our Enemies Tremble With Fear

6) PINAKA (mbrlS)

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

The Pinaka MBRLS (multiple barrel rocket launch system) is produced in India by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) for the Indian Army. Combat proven in the cold and high altitude regions during the Kargil conflict in 1999, Pinaka can fire up to 12 missiles/rockets in 44 seconds with a reload time as short as 4 minutes. A single launch system fitted on an 8×8 Tatra truck is loaded with 12 rockets which have a maximum range between 40 km-65 km. Pinaka makes use of the very advanced inertial navigation system (INS) which uses a computer, motion sensors and rotation sensors to calculate the position, orientation, and direction of a moving object.  Pinaka is capable of working in different modes namely autonomous mode, stand-alone mode, remote mode and manual mode. DRDO is also working on fitting GPS guidance systems on the rockets, and developing missiles with a baffling range of as much as 120kms. What’s surprising is the fact that Pinaka is approximately 10 times cheaper than its American peer, the M270.

5) T-90S BhiSHMA

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

Bhishma is the Indian name for the Russian-made T-90s tanks. An amalgam of T-80U and T-72B, the T-90S have superior fire control system and mobility. These tanks can be used for over three decades with little or no mid-life improvement. The tanks are fitted with the most advanced jamming systems, laser warning receivers, day and night sighting system and 125mm 2A46M smoothbore gun with thermal capabilities. A Bhishma tank, manned by a crew of three, weighs 48,000 kilos and can cross water obstacles as deep as 5 meters and carry 1600 liters of fuel (diesel) under its virtually impenetrable armor. Apart from its 125mm 2A46M smoothbore gun, the 12.7 mm machine gun mounted on the turret can be operated both manually and remotely. Seven hundred of these were purchased from Russia, and once another 347 (to be built in India) join in, India will have the largest force of modernized tanks in South Asia.

4) INS VIKRAMADITYAIndian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

By far the biggest and the most expensive aircraft carrier in the Indian Navy, this 45,000-kilo sea monster can carry up to 24 MiG-29K fighters and 6 ASW/AEW helicopters. INS Vikramaditya is fitted with sensor suites that keep it from being tracked by airborne radar systems. It was bought from Russia on 20 January 2004 at price of $2.35 billion, and on 14 June 2014, Prime Minister  Narendra Modi formally inducted INS Vikramaditya into the Indian Navy. Over 70 percent of the ship has been refurbished and its life expectancy is over 40 years.

3) NAG MISSILE AND NAMICA (NAG MISSILE CARRIER)

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

Developed at a cost of 3 billion rupees, NAG is a “fire-and-forget” anti-tank missile developed in India by the DRDO. Often reckoned as world’s only anti-tank missile which has a complete fiberglass structure, NAG weighs 42 kg, and can engage targets at ranges 4–5 km at a flight speed of 230 metres per second using infrared imaging system. NAMICA is the NAG missile carrier which is capable of carrying 12 missiles with 8 of them in ready-to-fire mode. NAMICA’s amphibious capabilities allow it to conquer almost any water body.

2)Sukhoi  SU-30MKI

Indian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

The SU-30MKI sits at the pinnacle of Indian military’s air superiority which, without this fighter jet, depends on the aged 4th-gen fighters. Simply put, a single plane is equivalent to 2 MiG-29 and 2 Jaguar combined. Costing Rs 358 Crore a unit, the Sukhoi Su-30MKI is a super-maneuverable twinjet air superiority fighter developed by India’s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).  Developed from the SU-30MK, the ‘I’ here stands for India after it was modified to fit Indian war needs by French, Israeli and Indian avionics in collaboration with an aim to create the ultimate Su-30 variant for India. It can load up to 8 tons of weapons, and soon it will be getting fitted with BrahMos and Nirbhay cruise missiles. With 314 aircrafts on order, India is the largest Su-30 operator in the world.

1) BRAHMOS MISSILEIndian Military Weapons That Will Make The Enemies Tremble With Fear

The world’s fastest cruise missile in operation, Brahmos travels at speeds of  Mach 2.8 to 3.0. It’s air-launched variant has been successfully test fired and India is now the only country with a supersonic cruise missiles in their army, navy, and air force. Compared to other missiles of the same category, BRAHMOS has 3 times more velocity, 3 times more flight range, 4 times more seeker range and 9 times more kinetic range. The current production rate is said to be 100 missiles per year. Also, the missile guarantees pin-point accuracy with hypersonic speed throughout the flight. The whole Brahmos project is expected to cost US$13 billion