BENIFITS OF FRUITS

Eating fruit provides health benefits — people who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body.

NutrientsGrapefruit Image

  • Most fruits are naturally low in , sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol.
  • Fruits are sources of many essential nutrients that are underconsumed, including potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid).
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Fruit sources of potassium include bananas, prunes and prune juice, dried peaches and apricots, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and orange juice.
  • Dietary fiber from fruits, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as fruits help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories. Whole or cut-up fruits are sources of dietary fiber; fruit juices contain little or no fiber.
  • Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues, helps heal cuts and wounds, and keeps teeth and gums healthy.
  • Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal.

Pizza delivery(Horror story)

Long ago I was working in pizza hut almost 11:00 I was about to go home , suddenly my boss called me and told me to deliver pizza at the black street , so I  went by the car  .  It  was  too  far from  the pizza hut shop  I was thinking the road is not  finishing  ,suddenly  I saw  a  child  standing in  front of the road  I asked  him ” are you lost”  but no answer  so  I  finaly  reached  the house  I nocked the  door I saw the same child  which  I   saw on  road  .  I was scaryed  and ran towards  my car  . I  never forget about  that

 

Thank you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ajanta Caves are 30 (approximately) rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE in Aurangabad district of Maharashtrastate of India.[1][note 1] The caves include paintings and rock-cut sculptures described as among the finest surviving examples of ancient Indian art, particularly expressive paintings that present emotion through gesture, pose and form.[2][3][4]

Ajanta Caves
UNESCO World Heritage site
Ajanta (63).jpg

The Ajanta Caves
Location Aurangabad DistrictMaharashtra State, India
Criteria Cultural: i, ii, iii, vi
Reference 242
Inscription 1983 (7th Session)
Area 8,242 ha
Buffer zone 78,676 ha
Coordinates 20°33′12″N 75°42′01″E
Ajanta Caves is located in India

Ajanta Caves
Location of Ajanta Caves in India

According to UNESCO, these are masterpieces of Buddhist religious art that influenced the Indian art that followed.[5] The caves were built in two phases, the first phase starting around the 2nd century BCE, while the second phase was built around 400–650 CE, according to older accounts, or in a brief period of 460–480 CE according to later scholarship.[6] The site is a protected monument in the care of the Archaeological Survey of India,[7] and since 1983, the Ajanta Caves have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Ajanta Caves constitute ancient monasteries and worship-halls of different Buddhist traditions carved into a 250-feet wall of rock.[8][9] The caves also present paintings depicting the past lives and rebirths of the Buddha, pictorial tales from Aryasura’s Jatakamala, and rock-cut sculptures of Buddhist deities.[8][10][11] Textual records suggest that these caves served as a monsoon retreat for monks, as well as a resting-site for merchants and pilgrims in ancient India.[8] While vivid colours and mural wall-painting were abundant in Indian history as evidenced by historical records, Caves 16, 17, 1 and 2 of Ajanta form the largest corpus of surviving ancient Indian wall-painting.[12]

Panoramic view of Ajanta Caves from the nearby hill

The Ajanta Caves are mentioned in the memoirs of several medieval-era Chinese Buddhist travellers to India and by a Mughal-era official of Akbar era in the early 17th century.[13] They were covered by jungle until accidentally “discovered” and brought to Western attention in 1819 by a colonial British officer Captain John Smith on a tiger-hunting party.[14] The Ajanta Caves are located on the side of a rocky cliff that is on the north side of a U-shaped gorge on the small river Waghur,[15] in the Deccan plateau.[16][17]Further round the gorge are a number of waterfalls, which, when the river is high, are audible from outside the caves.[18]

With the Ellora Caves, Ajanta is one of the major tourist attractions of Maharashtra. It is about 59 kilometres (37 miles) from the city of JalgaonMaharashtraIndia, 60 kilometres (37 miles) from Pachora, 104 kilometres (65 miles) from the city of Aurangabad, and 350 kilometres (220 miles) east-northeast from Mumbai.[8][19] It is 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the Ellora Caves, which contain HinduJain and Buddhist caves, the last dating from a period similar to Ajanta. The Ajanta style is also found in the Ellora Caves and other sites such as the Elephanta CavesAurangabad CavesShivleni Caves and the cave temples of Karnataka.[20]

The Ajanta Caves are 30 (approximately) rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE in Aurangabad district of Maharashtrastate of India.[1][note 1] The caves include paintings and rock-cut sculptures described as among the finest surviving examples of ancient Indian art, particularly expressive paintings that present emotion through gesture, pose and form.[2][3][4]

Ajanta Caves
UNESCO World Heritage site
Ajanta (63).jpg

The Ajanta Caves
Location Aurangabad DistrictMaharashtra State, India
Criteria Cultural: i, ii, iii, vi
Reference 242
Inscription 1983 (7th Session)
Area 8,242 ha
Buffer zone 78,676 ha
Coordinates 20°33′12″N 75°42′01″E
Ajanta Caves is located in India

Ajanta Caves
Location of Ajanta Caves in India

According to UNESCO, these are masterpieces of Buddhist religious art that influenced the Indian art that followed.[5] The caves were built in two phases, the first phase starting around the 2nd century BCE, while the second phase was built around 400–650 CE, according to older accounts, or in a brief period of 460–480 CE according to later scholarship.[6] The site is a protected monument in the care of the Archaeological Survey of India,[7] and since 1983, the Ajanta Caves have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Ajanta Caves constitute ancient monasteries and worship-halls of different Buddhist traditions carved into a 250-feet wall of rock.[8][9] The caves also present paintings depicting the past lives and rebirths of the Buddha, pictorial tales from Aryasura’s Jatakamala, and rock-cut sculptures of Buddhist deities.[8][10][11] Textual records suggest that these caves served as a monsoon retreat for monks, as well as a resting-site for merchants and pilgrims in ancient India.[8] While vivid colours and mural wall-painting were abundant in Indian history as evidenced by historical records, Caves 16, 17, 1 and 2 of Ajanta form the largest corpus of surviving ancient Indian wall-painting.[12]

Panoramic view of Ajanta Caves from the nearby hill

The Ajanta Caves are mentioned in the memoirs of several medieval-era Chinese Buddhist travellers to India and by a Mughal-era official of Akbar era in the early 17th century.[13] They were covered by jungle until accidentally “discovered” and brought to Western attention in 1819 by a colonial British officer Captain John Smith on a tiger-hunting party.[14] The Ajanta Caves are located on the side of a rocky cliff that is on the north side of a U-shaped gorge on the small river Waghur,[15] in the Deccan plateau.[16][17]Further round the gorge are a number of waterfalls, which, when the river is high, are audible from outside the caves.[18]

With the Ellora Caves, Ajanta is one of the major tourist attractions of Maharashtra. It is about 59 kilometres (37 miles) from the city of JalgaonMaharashtraIndia, 60 kilometres (37 miles) from Pachora, 104 kilometres (65 miles) from the city of Aurangabad, and 350 kilometres (220 miles) east-northeast from Mumbai.[8][19] It is 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the Ellora Caves, which contain HinduJain and Buddhist caves, the last dating from a period similar to Ajanta. The Ajanta style is also found in the Ellora Caves and other sites such as the Elephanta CavesAurangabad CavesShivleni Caves and the cave temples of Karnataka.[20]

The Ajanta Caves are 30 (approximately) rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE in Aurangabad district of Maharashtrastate of India.[1][note 1] The caves include paintings and rock-cut sculptures described as among the finest surviving examples of ancient Indian art, particularly expressive paintings that present emotion through gesture, pose and form.[2][3][4]

Ajanta Caves
UNESCO World Heritage site
Ajanta (63).jpg

The Ajanta Caves
Location Aurangabad DistrictMaharashtra State, India
Criteria Cultural: i, ii, iii, vi
Reference 242
Inscription 1983 (7th Session)
Area 8,242 ha
Buffer zone 78,676 ha
Coordinates 20°33′12″N 75°42′01″E
Ajanta Caves is located in India

Ajanta Caves
Location of Ajanta Caves in India

According to UNESCO, these are masterpieces of Buddhist religious art that influenced the Indian art that followed.[5] The caves were built in two phases, the first phase starting around the 2nd century BCE, while the second phase was built around 400–650 CE, according to older accounts, or in a brief period of 460–480 CE according to later scholarship.[6] The site is a protected monument in the care of the Archaeological Survey of India,[7] and since 1983, the Ajanta Caves have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Ajanta Caves constitute ancient monasteries and worship-halls of different Buddhist traditions carved into a 250-feet wall of rock.[8][9] The caves also present paintings depicting the past lives and rebirths of the Buddha, pictorial tales from Aryasura’s Jatakamala, and rock-cut sculptures of Buddhist deities.[8][10][11] Textual records suggest that these caves served as a monsoon retreat for monks, as well as a resting-site for merchants and pilgrims in ancient India.[8] While vivid colours and mural wall-painting were abundant in Indian history as evidenced by historical records, Caves 16, 17, 1 and 2 of Ajanta form the largest corpus of surviving ancient Indian wall-painting.[12]

Panoramic view of Ajanta Caves from the nearby hill

The Ajanta Caves are mentioned in the memoirs of several medieval-era Chinese Buddhist travellers to India and by a Mughal-era official of Akbar era in the early 17th century.[13] They were covered by jungle until accidentally “discovered” and brought to Western attention in 1819 by a colonial British officer Captain John Smith on a tiger-hunting party.[14] The Ajanta Caves are located on the side of a rocky cliff that is on the north side of a U-shaped gorge on the small river Waghur,[15] in the Deccan plateau.[16][17]Further round the gorge are a number of waterfalls, which, when the river is high, are audible from outside the caves.[18]

With the Ellora Caves, Ajanta is one of the major tourist attractions of Maharashtra. It is about 59 kilometres (37 miles) from the city of JalgaonMaharashtraIndia, 60 kilometres (37 miles) from Pachora, 104 kilometres (65 miles) from the city of Aurangabad, and 350 kilometres (220 miles) east-northeast from Mumbai.[8][19] It is 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the Ellora Caves, which contain HinduJain and Buddhist caves, the last dating from a period similar to Ajanta. The Ajanta style is also found in the Ellora Caves and other sites such as the Elephanta CavesAurangabad CavesShivleni Caves and the cave temples of Karnataka.[20]

The Ajanta Caves are 30 (approximately) rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE in Aurangabad district of Maharashtrastate of India.[1][note 1] The caves include paintings and rock-cut sculptures described as among the finest surviving examples of ancient Indian art, particularly expressive paintings that present emotion through gesture, pose and form.[2][3][4]

Ajanta Caves
UNESCO World Heritage site
Ajanta (63).jpg

The Ajanta Caves
Location Aurangabad DistrictMaharashtra State, India
Criteria Cultural: i, ii, iii, vi
Reference 242
Inscription 1983 (7th Session)
Area 8,242 ha
Buffer zone 78,676 ha
Coordinates 20°33′12″N 75°42′01″E
Ajanta Caves is located in India

Ajanta Caves
Location of Ajanta Caves in India

According to UNESCO, these are masterpieces of Buddhist religious art that influenced the Indian art that followed.[5] The caves were built in two phases, the first phase starting around the 2nd century BCE, while the second phase was built around 400–650 CE, according to older accounts, or in a brief period of 460–480 CE according to later scholarship.[6] The site is a protected monument in the care of the Archaeological Survey of India,[7] and since 1983, the Ajanta Caves have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Ajanta Caves constitute ancient monasteries and worship-halls of different Buddhist traditions carved into a 250-feet wall of rock.[8][9] The caves also present paintings depicting the past lives and rebirths of the Buddha, pictorial tales from Aryasura’s Jatakamala, and rock-cut sculptures of Buddhist deities.[8][10][11] Textual records suggest that these caves served as a monsoon retreat for monks, as well as a resting-site for merchants and pilgrims in ancient India.[8] While vivid colours and mural wall-painting were abundant in Indian history as evidenced by historical records, Caves 16, 17, 1 and 2 of Ajanta form the largest corpus of surviving ancient Indian wall-painting.[12]

Panoramic view of Ajanta Caves from the nearby hill

The Ajanta Caves are mentioned in the memoirs of several medieval-era Chinese Buddhist travellers to India and by a Mughal-era official of Akbar era in the early 17th century.[13] They were covered by jungle until accidentally “discovered” and brought to Western attention in 1819 by a colonial British officer Captain John Smith on a tiger-hunting party.[14] The Ajanta Caves are located on the side of a rocky cliff that is on the north side of a U-shaped gorge on the small river Waghur,[15] in the Deccan plateau.[16][17]Further round the gorge are a number of waterfalls, which, when the river is high, are audible from outside the caves.[18]

With the Ellora Caves, Ajanta is one of the major tourist attractions of Maharashtra. It is about 59 kilometres (37 miles) from the city of JalgaonMaharashtraIndia, 60 kilometres (37 miles) from Pachora, 104 kilometres (65 miles) from the city of Aurangabad, and 350 kilometres (220 miles) east-northeast from Mumbai.[8][19] It is 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the Ellora Caves, which contain HinduJain and Buddhist caves, the last dating from a period similar to Ajanta. The Ajanta style is also found in the Ellora Caves and other sites such as the Elephanta CavesAurangabad CavesShivleni Caves and the cave temples of Karnataka.[20]

Disney Princess, also called the Princess Line,[2] is a media franchise and toy-lineowned by The Walt Disney Company. Created by Disney Consumer Products chairman Andy Mooney in the early 2000s, the franchise features a line-up of fictional female protagonists who have appeared in various Disney franchises.

Disney Princess
DisneyPrincessLineup2013.jpg

The 2013, and current, line-up of the Disney Princess franchise. From left to right: MulanSnow WhiteTianaCinderellaBelleMeridaRapunzelArielAuroraJasmine, and Pocahontas
Created by Andy Mooney
Original work Animated films
Animated series
Print publications
Book(s) Disney Princess Chapter Books
A Jewel Story
Novel(s) May 7, 2005 – present
Comics Kilala Princess (manga)
Magazine(s) Disney Princess
Films and television
Film(s) Enchanted Tales: Follow Your Dreams
Animated series
Games
Video game(s)
Audio
Original music
Miscellaneous
Toys Dolls
Palace Pets
Extension Palace Pets[1]

The franchise does not include all princess characters from the whole of Disney-owned media, but rather refers to select specific characters from the company’s animated films and series. As of 2013, the eleven characters considered part of the franchise are Snow WhiteCinderellaAuroraArielBelleJasminePocahontasMulanTianaRapunzel, and Merida.[3][4]

The franchise has released dolls, sing-along videos, apparel, beauty products, home decor, toys, and a variety of other products featuring some of the Disney Princesses.[5] Licensees for the franchise include Glidden (wall paint), Stride Rite (sparkly shoes), Hasbro (games and dolls), and plastic Fisher-Price figurines.